NR 000153 Brewski & Jackson Closed Case

Recovered153Jackson

NR 000153 Brewski & Jackson

When we send out periodic ALERTS, we never know what kind of information might come back. We do keep trying. Horses live a long time and people move around, sell them, or just forget that we are still watching. There are any number of reasons.

2 horses were taken from Taylor Ranch (Boarding Barn) the morning on June 21, 2010. Brewski was found in Wyoming.  Jackson is still missing. Please help find Jackson!

Report Details: http://www.netposse.com/view_report.asp?reportid=153 

#ColdCase #HelpFindJackson #Arizona #StolenHorse #NetPosse™ #BringingHorsesHome

#StolenHorseInternational™ #NeverGiveUp     

6/25/2017 5:35:00 AM

After publishing our cold case alert, we were informed both of Brewski and Jackson were found in August 2010. Brewski went back home to Tucson, the people who were taking care of Jackson after the 2 horse were abandoned by the thief in Wy ended up keeping Jackson. We are so glad this was a happy ending for both horses!

 

NR 005289 Sunny, Booger, Darlin, Buttercup, Flica, Cagney, & Lacey

NR 005289

NR 005289

NetPosse™ Missing Equines, NR005289 for Sunny, Booger, Darlin, Buttercup, Flica, Cagney & Lacy DOI: July 1, 2017:

For more details: http://www.netposse.com/view_report.asp?reportid=5289

Missing presumed stolen. Fence was cut. 4 ponies, 2 llama and a mini donkey taken from 1401cr 322 in Rockdale Texas. No questions asked, just want my babies back!

Please help us find them & Bring Them Home!

Please help find Sunny, Booger, Darlin, Buttercup, Flica, Cagney & Lacy by sharing this information to your friends, social media groups, etc.

#Nature #Missing #Lost #Loose #Horse #EveryShareHelps #NetPosse™ #StolenHorseInternational™ #BringingHorsesHome™ #NeverGiveUp #Texas

It’s Not About The Money

Capture

It’s Not About the Money

I’ve mentioned before here that I volunteer for this organization. I can truthfully say this article is absolutely true-it isn’t about the money.  For one thing-none of us are paid.

I probably put in 20-30 hours each week on this. Why? Because if my horses were missing, I would want to know that somebody cared enough to be doing what I do. Now what I do isn’t the ‘oooo, isn’t she wonderful? I want to be just like her!’ stuff. Far from it. I answer emails (yeah, isn’t that exciting?), look for places that we can ask if we can come in to speak to their members or at their events (and hope we can get them to at least partially pay the bill for getting there and back), write articles to put on our web site, look for funders that will consider us for funding (which is really tough because we have to fit their criteria of what they want to fund-and we are a star-shaped peg for round and square holes), conduct fundraisers such as selling T-shirts, send out ALERT messages to our network and targeted emails, research various projects, monitor volunteer activities, and various and sundry other things. Like I said-nothing anybody would want to emulate, but every bit of it necessary to keeping the place going.

I’m not the only one-not by a long shot. We have a team of volunteers who do nothing but scour the auctions every day for horses in our database. It’s tedious, time-consuming, and, frankly, I can’t do it. It breaks my heart. But they do it. Every so often, they hit pay dirt-and we send another horse home. Sometimes the horse has only been gone a week or so, but sometimes it could have been missing for years. It’s like panning for gold. You just never know.

Others work on updating our databases for auctions, Quarantines, transporters, and just good contacts to know about. You’ll never know their names or see their faces, and they don’t get paid. But their work pays off when we are moving fast after a missing horse.

Our report managers deal directly with the clients and law enforcement. They take the heat-the anger, fear, frustration, denial, accusations of  cruelty, and so on-and they keep on going. They are lied to and about regularly. Yet they persist and yet, when the horses are located, they are ignored and forgotten without a word of gratitude. It makes you wonder about the human race. It really does.

All of us ‘bust our butts’ constantly to locate horses. We cannot promise miracles. Yes, some of the work is dependent on what the owner does or doesn’t do-there are only a few of us and we cannot be everywhere. But we do everything we possibly can and we keep doing it.

Is it really too much to ask for a Thank You and support?

 

Searching for Malibu

5235Malibu

Why this horse is being searched for:

“As a child I never had my own pony, I worked at the stables every weekend and school holidays. Like many I have fantastic memories of my younger years with horses, spending time with that favourite pony…

Mine was Malibu, he was the very best! 12.2hh bay, he was stubborn, hard to catch, and kicked but I loved him with all my heart. I grew carrots in my garden just for him, saved up my pocket money to buy him his own headcollar and numnah, and would always nag mum to take me to see him after school.

I was forced to leave him,after being bullied and humiliated. I remember our last day together I cried and cried into his mane. I told him that this was not good bye and promised we’d be together again.

A year later he was sold! I have been trying to trace him ever since. I wonder every day what has happened to him, and I am determined to find him.

Now I’m an adult and the whole idea seems crazy: 1 in 1 million horses in the UK if he’s even still with us. WHAT’S THE POINT???  BECAUSE IT’S MY DREAM! ”

NetPosse is searching for Malibu to help her realize her dream. If you have information, please forward it to NetPosse or to her at the links on the webpage. Malibu’s web page

Coyotes-Misunderstood? Threat?

These are some of the most adaptable critters around-and they have learned to live in amongst humans regardless of what we do. There are coyotes that live entirely in big cities such as Chicago, Detroit, and New York City. And why not? The cities are full of their prey-rats, mice, feral cats, stray dogs, possums, and raccoons. Most of the time, humans rarely see them. Coyote

The problems arise when-and because-humans insist on thinking that because they have a piece of paper that says they have title to a bit of land that it ‘belongs’ to them and no one else. The mistake they make is thinking this applies to ALL CREATURES. Got news-the animals don’t know a thing about property lines, titles, quit claims, deeds, or anything of that real estate stuff. We live in THEIR WORLD-not the other way around. If you think of things being as though you are a guest in THEIR home, and you need to be careful about not staining the carpet, picking up after yourself, not being a pig hog at the dinner table, and minding your manners, it makes more sense.

So here is an article offering suggestions about what to do if you encounter coyotes while out with your dog. Coyotes are not normally agressive, but they will defend their dens. (Any mama will defend her babies!)

  • For heaven’s sake, do not feed them.
  • Do not allow small dogs and cats to run loose particularly in the evenings and early mornings.
  • Lose that retractable leash. I know you like it and your dog likes it, but lose it. You can’t reel that dog in fast enough if you come face to face with a coyote.
  • Maintain eye contact.
  • Do not run.
  • Retreat calmly-even if you have to walk backward.
  • Haze the coyote into leaving-throw rocks, yell, wave your arms, whatever works.

article on coyotes